Note Frequency Chart (Free Guide)

Hello Composers, Mike here! :slight_smile:
I created this note frequency chart as a reference guide for music composition, production and mixing:

Frequency Chart for Octave 0

  • C = 16.35 Hz
  • C#/Db = 17.32 Hz
  • D = 18.35 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 19.45 Hz
  • E = 20.60 Hz
  • F = 21.83 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 23.12 Hz
  • G = 24.50 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 25.96 Hz
  • A = 27.50 Hz (Lowest Piano Note)
  • A#/Bb = 29.14 Hz
  • B = 30.87 Hz
  • C = 32.70 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 1

  • C = 32.70 Hz
  • C#/Db = 34.65 Hz
  • D = 36.71 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 38.89 Hz
  • E = 41.20 Hz
  • F = 43.65 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 46.25 Hz
  • G = 49.00 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 51.91 Hz
  • A = 55.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 58.27 Hz
  • B = 61.74 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 2

  • C = 65.41 Hz
  • C#/Db = 69.30 Hz
  • D = 73.42 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 77.78 Hz
  • E = 82.41 Hz
  • F = 87.31 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 92.50 Hz
  • G = 98.00 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 103.83 Hz
  • A = 110.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 116.54 Hz
  • B = 123.47 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 3

  • C = 130.81 Hz
  • C#/Db = 138.59 Hz
  • D = 146.83 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 155.56 Hz
  • E = 164.81 Hz
  • F = 174.61 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 185.00 Hz
  • G = 196.00 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 207.65 Hz
  • A = 220.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 233.08 Hz
  • B = 246.94 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 4

  • C = 261.63 Hz (Middle C)
  • C#/Db = 277.18 Hz
  • D = 293.66 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 311.13 Hz
  • E = 329.63 Hz
  • F = 349.23 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 369.99 Hz
  • G = 392.00 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 415.30 Hz
  • A = 440.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 466.16 Hz
  • B = 493.88 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 5

  • C = 523.25 Hz
  • C#/Db = 554.37 Hz
  • D = 587.33 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 622.25 Hz
  • E = 659.25 Hz
  • F = 698.46 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 739.99 Hz
  • G = 783.99 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 830.61 Hz
  • A = 880.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 932.33 Hz
  • B = 987.77 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 6

  • C = 1046.50 Hz
  • C#/Db = 1108.73 Hz
  • D = 1174.66 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 1244.51 Hz
  • E = 1318.51 Hz
  • F = 1396.91 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 1479.98 Hz
  • G = 1567.98 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 1661.22 Hz
  • A = 1760.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 1864.66 Hz
  • B = 1975.53 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 7

  • C = 2093.00 Hz
  • C#/Db = 2217.46 Hz
  • D = 2349.32 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 2489.02 Hz
  • E = 2637.02 Hz
  • F = 2793.83 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 2959.96 Hz
  • G = 3135.96 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 3322.44 Hz
  • A = 3520.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 3729.31 Hz
  • B = 3951.07 Hz

Frequency Chart for Octave 8

  • C = 4186.01 Hz (Highest Piano Note)
  • C#/Db = 4434.92 Hz
  • D = 4698.63 Hz
  • D#/Eb = 4978.03 Hz
  • E = 5274.04 Hz
  • F = 5587.65 Hz
  • F#/Gb = 5919.91 Hz
  • G = 6271.93 Hz
  • G#/Ab = 6644.88 Hz
  • A = 7040.00 Hz
  • A#/Bb = 7458.62 Hz
  • B = 7902.13 Hz

NOTE: Pay special attention to which note and corresponding frequency the lowest, middle and highest key has on a full sized piano. This will give you a great perspective on the fundamental frequencies of the written notes of music.

4 Likes

Great idea. You can actually buy posters mapping out different instruments within the frequency spectrum. I did stumble across this one a while ago, which is more pictorial for those that work with images better - http://blog.landr.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Instrument_Frequency_Chart.jpg

2 Likes

Yes I had one of those in the past. I personally use this frequency chart mainly for mixing and production purposes, tuning sounds to the root key (example kick and low end drums), checking the harmonic overtones (octaves) for mixing etc. :slight_smile:

Another thing is that I believe it is very important to get an idea of the general frequency range for each octave. Some people new to this might be surprised by how “narrow” the range is for the full 88 keys of music on a piano. The fundamental stops just above 4000kHz, while we can hear all the way up to 20k (if we are lucky). :smile:

I strongly think that charts can be super harmful because people who use them tend to rely more on their eyes than their ears when mixing, especially when a harmonic that need to be toned down is slightly out of tune. Ear training would be a way more effective and faster solution :slight_smile:

I trained my ears using this fantastic app called Quiztones https://theproaudiofiles.com/quiztones/
I was shocked to see how fast my ears were improving and within a couple of days of actively practicing, I was able to instantly find in which frequency range a note was located when I heard it.

Quick tip:
If you have a frequency and want to find the equivalent an octave higher, you simply multiply it by two, for example:

  • A4 = 440 Hz
  • A5 = 440 x 2 = 880 Hz

To go an octave lower, you divide it by two

  • A3 = 440 / 2 = 220 Hz

Cheers!
Medhat

1 Like

Nice find there Medhat. For those on Android this app has not been updated for a while but never fear there is this one https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.saninnsalas.audiotraining&hl=en to train your ears with.

1 Like

I use this in mastering all the time. I don’t master rock and pop as much as I used to, but there have been times I narrowed my Q and used eq to notch out a single frequency—often a wooly bass guitar’s second partial was the culprit—to dramatically clean up a master. I used note-frequency charts constantly.

This was a “secret technique” I had that could improve bass clarity almost magically. I don’t think many mastering engineers know about it.

2 Likes