How to use Suspended Chords in Your Music (Tutorial)

Hello my friends! :slight_smile:
I made a new video: Learn How to use Suspended Chords in Your Music.

3 Likes

Always love suspended chords; great at the end of a grand and broad, noble piece. And don’ t forget the divine “god” chord, the G sus😉

1 Like

Haha, well to me, the “God” chord is probably more like those super mega big harmonies played by a gigantic church organ in a big cathedral. With the effect on the audience being the feeling of how tiny and insignificant you are in the presence of God (note: I am not religious myself). :stuck_out_tongue:

1 Like

Oh I know. Those organs are pretty intimidating when you see them in person. Camille Saint- Saëns has some big organ chords in his 3rd symphony, I believe it is.

Do you prefer sus2 or sus4 more? I kind of like the sound of the sus4 but like the 9th extension if you use it as a suspended chord, if you will, which harmonically equates to a sus2. That way you get a root chord in the “overtone series” position when you resolve, 1-5-3(8va)

1 Like

You could debate whether there such a thing as sus2 at all, and not just one type of “suspended chord”…seeing as the inversion is just a sus4 of the chord a perfect 4th down. However, I personally use the terms sus2 and sus4 since the intention and harmonic anchor is what counts to me. :slight_smile:

It’s the same with everything above the octave. 9th…or is it simply add2 an octave above? Well, enough music philosophy, I am not a purist at all when it comes to music theory, or how I choose to explain it in my courses. :stuck_out_tongue:

The great thing about both adding the major 2nd or perfect 4th…is that kind of “soft tension” it creates…which can be used in pretty much any type of music to add emotion! :wink:

1 Like

Yeah, I don’t get hung up on the theory too much either. I guess it’s just a matter if you leave out the third (susX) or seventh (addX) in root position. I have a heavy metal song I wrote years ago which I use consecutive sus2 chords in the chorus (technically it’s drop-D tuning, so they read 1-5-9) and I love the emotional pull they give. Like you said, soft tension, with sad soulful vibe.

1 Like